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Update by user Jul 31, 2016

AHS wrote back to the BBB in response to my original complaint. THe AHS response was unacceptable to me.

Here is what I wrote back to the BBB:

"This response from American Home Shield (AHS) is not acceptable to me. I will explain below why that is the case. To facilitate your understanding of my explanation, I am attaching a full copy of my original complaint. (I am doing that because, in my original submission to the BBB, I found a way to paste-in portions of that document but I did not find a way to attach the complete document.

Accordingly, there may be portions of it you've not seen before.)

Most importantly, AHS did not respond to the portions of my complaint alleging that AHS utilizes deceptive marketing practices. In my complaint, I carefully laid out four such practices. If AHS agrees that some or all of my allegations are correct, AHS needs to admit that and to make the changes necessary to eliminate those deceptive marketing practices in the future. If AHS does not agree, AHS needs to explain how each practice I noted is not deceptive.

I appreciate AHS' undertaking to refund my pre-paid $75 service fee for a service they knew (but did not tell me) was not covered. However that paragraph of their July 13, 2016, letter to the BBB is disingenuous at best. Instead of admitting that it was an honest mistake that needs to be corrected, AHS asserts that Section D-1 of the warranty plan obligates every customer to pay a service fee for merely requesting service (regardless of whether or not the requested service is a covered service). In other word, AHS would have you believe it is returning my $75 out of the goodness of its heart.

The reason AHS agreed to refund my $75 is because they never should have accepted it in the first place and because Section D-1 is unenforceable when it comes to non-covered services. If AHS agrees with that statement, AHS needs to say so and modify the wording of Section D-1 accordingly. If AHS does not agree with that statement, AHS needs to explain why not.

With regard to the air conditioning issue raised in my complaint, the only response from AHS that will satisfy me is to pay $3,000 toward the purchase of a new air conditioning system for my home.

For reasons enumerated in my complaint, though, I am not holding my breath while awaiting the arrival of a $3,000 check from AHS. But hope springs eternal: on the remote chance that it may make a difference, I am attaching a copy of the receipt for the $6,765 that I paid on June 14, 2016, to replace my repeatedly-repaired, constantly-failing, 20-year-old air conditioning system.

To the final point in AHS' letter of July 13th: While it is plain to see that I am dissatisfied, my complaint did not include anything about cancelling my AHS Home Warranty. In her letter to the BBB, Ms. Tiffany does an excellent job of explaining just how costly that action would be to me under the terms of the latest version of my contact with AHS.

In past years, I've made the mistake of allowing that contract (with whatever unilateral changes AHS may have decided to slip in...) to roll over from year to year. When my current contract runs its course, I will not repeat that mistake.

Through personal experience, I've learned the true nature of AHS and how it preys on unsuspecting American consumers. In addition to obtaining justice for myself, I hope what I have written here and in my original complaint will help accomplish two things: (1) Compel AHS to change its business model into one that treats its customers and vendors with honesty and respect and (2) Until such time as that may happen, enable AHS' customers and potential customers to understand how poorly their interests are served by AHS."

Update by user Jul 02, 2016

DO BUSINESS WITH AMERICAN HOME SHIELD AT YOUR OWN RISK!

The primary reason so many of their customers (myself included) end up loathing AHS is that the company relies on deceptive marketing practices to sell its services. In many cases, their “partners in deception” are the real estate agents who advise sellers to provide a home warranty and who then tell buyers that the seller’s home warranty has much more value to them than it really does.

By whatever means, AHS’ direct and indirect customers are duped into believing that the AHS warranty pays the full cost of repair or replacement when, in fact, it simply does not. The illusion that “no matter what breaks, all I will have to spend to get it fixed (or replaced!) is $75” is what AHS sells to all of its unsuspecting customers. AHS sells that illusion by deceptive marketing. Listed below are four of the deceptions that seduced me and, I assume, many of you into doing business with AHS.

This is what prospective customers will find on the AHS website:

DECEPTION #1: Our home warranty is a contract that covers repair or replacement. As a prospective customer, you want to believe “cover” means AHS will pay whatever it takes to repair or replace any covered item that doesn’t work. As further explained below, that is patently false. However that is exactly what AHS wants you to believe.

DECEPTION #2: You do not pay the replacement cost for covered items. This comes as close as anything I’ve found on the AHS website to being an outright lie. That’s because the contract (which you and I signed…) says “coverage is subject to limitations”. While there are many limitations in the contract, this might be the biggest one: “The customer is responsible for payment of costs in excess of $3,000”.

So, under the best of conditions, to replace a $10,000 central A/C unit, AHS pays $3,000 and you pay $7,000. (More than likely, though, AHS will pay nothing to replace your A/C … because they will NEVER decide that it cannot be repaired!)

DECEPTION #3: You do not pay the actual repair cost for covered items. While not nearly as misleading or potentially costly as #2 above, this statement is half true at best. Again, the carefully crafted words are intended to make you believe that AHS pays everything it may take to repair any covered item.

But, in reality, they do not. One example is the actual cost of repairing a central air conditioning unit. AHS pays $10/pound for any replacement refrigerant that is required. This leaves you with paying the rest … which amounts to something between $600 and $900.

*DECEPTION #4: AHS has the sole right to determine whether a covered system or appliance will be repaired or replaced. This shows up in the contract, not in the marketing hype. Strictly speaking, therefore, it does not qualify as a deceptive marketing practice. That’s because you and I both had the option of refusing to sign the contract.

You and I had the option of walking away instead of forfeiting the right to have any say whatsoever in determining when replacement is necessary. Taking full advantage of volume pricing for repair parts on a nation-wide basis and taking full advantage of its ability to squeeze lower prices out of its local contractors in exchange for bringing them our business, means that AHS is incentivized to repair, not to replace. ONE PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: WHY AHS WILL NEVER REPLACE MY OLD, CONSTANTLY FALTERING A/C UNIT. (OR YOURS EITHER!) While I sit here roasting in my house for the second week in a row with no A/C in Florida, in June (but only for the EIGHTH time) -- let’s do the math: 1.

Currently I pay AHS $592/year. It goes up each year and, therefore, used to be lower. Still, let’s call it $6,000 for the 10 years. 2.

Every time AHS sends a repairman, I pay $75. For the eight trips (to date) to repair my A/C, then, I’ve paid another $600 (8 x $75 = $600). That $75 service fee also goes up each year but I’m rounding off things to make the math easier to follow. 3.

Every time an A/C repair entails replacing the refrigerant, I pay between $600 and $900 for the repair. (Remember Deception #3: “You do not pay the actual repair cost…”?!) Presently, there is a leak in the evaporator coil. Instead of spending the $2,500 or so that a new coil would cost, AHS pays its contractor to take it back to his shop, find the leak(s) and patch them up until next time. Since I’ll have to pay to replace the refrigerant again (and AHS just called to tell me I have to pay $975 for the refrigerant this time…), lets call it $1,600 out of my pocket for refrigerant.

So, in round numbers, I’ve paid $8,200. So far. 4. Needless to say, AHS has spent considerably less than $8,200 on my repairs.

In addition to providing the odd float switches, capacitors etc, they replaced the compressor and the air handler’s fan motor. In the process (counting return trips) they may have paid for 8 or 10 contractor trips to my house. Even when you figure the other trips their contractors may have made to my house and the cost of the hot water heater they replaced a few years ago, AHS is making plenty of money on me. 5.

What incentive does AHS have to change their behavior? What incentive does AHS have to EVER exercise their “sole right” to decide to replace instead of repair (over and over, forever) my central A/C? Of course the answer to both questions is “None”. 6.

That’s the carefully constructed AHS business model and it’s been working great on me! The AHS lawyers, MBAs and accounts have done their jobs well. A SECOND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: PRE-PAYING THE $75 SERVICE FEE FOR A SERVICE THAT AHS KNEW OR SHOULD HAVE KNOWN WAS NOT COVERED. I noticed a pin hole water leak in the water main at the point where it enters my house.

I called AHS and clearly explained exactly where the water leak was. I provided complete detail, down to the point of explaining that shutting off the water valve just outside of my house would do no good because the pinhole leak was just to the downstream side of that valve. After AHS asked me if there was any water damage inside of my house, I restated the fact that the leak was OUTSIDE. When the AHS plumber arrived and looked at the leak, he immediately said “This repair is not covered by AHS because it is outside of the building foundation.” After reading my contract, it was easy to see that he was right.

When I asked him whether or not I was obliged to pay his company the $75 service fee, he said “No”. Then, since I had pre-paid that fee directly to AHS at the time I placed the service order, I called AHS to request a refund. As per Reason #4 (below), the AHS person taking my call told me I would have to call someone else. When I ask her instead to relay my reasonable request to her supervisor, she explained that she would have to fill out a form and that AHS would have to listen to the recording of my phone call (to be convinced that I was not lying about all this).

Explaining that I did not have the time it would take to wait for another AHS phone call, I asked her to please do that. So far, a week has passed with no sign from AHS that I will ever receive that refund. THE TOP FOUR REASONS THAT I WILL GET AHS OUT OF MY LIFE. AS SOON AS I CAN.

FOREVER. (FOR YOUR OWN WELL BEING, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER DOING THE SAME.) 1. THE BIG LIE. It is comforting to believe that “no matter what breaks, all I will have to spend to get it fixed (or replaced!) is $75”.

Utilizing deceptive marketing practices which prey upon the human weakness of “believing what you want to believe”, AHS sells THE BIG LIE to untold thousands of unsuspecting customers nationwide. Once the potential customer has bitten, he/she is reeled in and given a contract that says something quite different. Classic bait-and-switch. 2.

The Contractual Handcuffs. Under the terms of my contract with AHS, I voluntarily waived numerous rights and ceded complete control to AHS over the process whereby repairs are made to the covered appliances and systems in my home. That is not a good thing to do for many reasons, including: • Instead of shopping around for the best price (and prompt installation) on, say, a hot water heater replacement, my family takes cold showers for two weeks while I dicker with AHS and its contractor. • Instead of calling A/C repair companies until I find one that can provide the service I need “now”, I call AHS and wait for their selected contractor to work me into his schedule.

At that point, that contractor has captive business (mine). AHS picked him for my job because he agreed to charge AHS less than other (better? busier?) contractors would have charged them. • Because I am a “captive”, I cannot take my business elsewhere -- even if I’m treated badly.

My only recourse is to complain long enough and loud enough to convince AHS to assign another contractor to my job. That, of course, serves to put me at the end of yet another line. 3. The Opposite of Prompt Service.

It is no accident that you and I end up waiting and waiting and waiting, powerless to do anything to minimize or avoid delays. AHS has (of course!) carefully designed their repair process to take whatever time they care to take. Accordingly, they’ve included this disclaimer in your contract and mine: “AHS is not responsible or liable for any … delays”. The AHS repair process does nothing for your convenience or mine.

On the contrary, it does everything for the convenience of AHS and everything for minimizing AHS’ costs. • The first delay is the time it can take (24 business hours = 3 days, not counting weekends) for the contractor to contact you to set up an appointment. • The news from the AHS contractor (“We-can’t-get-out-there-until-next-Monday”) is but the second of many delays. In many cases, the AHS process requires multiple visits.

• The most common reason for the third delay is that AHS requires their contractors to get specific approval from AHS to proceed with certain repairs. Getting that approval can turn into an additional three-day delay: Day 1, Contractor’s Diagnosis; Day 2, Notify AHS of the diagnosis and request approval to do the repair; Day 3, AHS approval. • The fourth delay is usually the longest. This delay is imposed on the contractor (and on you, the patsy the “valued customer”) by AHS’ insistence on using repair parts sourced by AHS.

Instead of using a part that is available “today” (in stock locally), AHS will take as long as a week to find the part in their system and ship it to their contractor – while you continue roasting or taking cold showers as the case may be. 4. The Communication ***. With apologies to Seinfeld and his “Soup Nazi”, the use of this analogy makes AHS’ dictatorial control over customer communications somewhat easier to comprehend.

Simply put, ALL communication between AHS and its customers is done ONLY on AHS’ terms. For example: • Whenever it suits their purposes, AHS will email its customers. In response, the only thing AHS “allows” its customers to do is call. Normally, calling a large company and talking to an actual human being would be considered a good thing.

With AHS, not so; for two reasons: (a) By design(?), customers are ALWAYS required to wait on hold for a minimum of 20 minutes, thereby holding down the number of customers who call. (b) Whenever a customer with a complaint or a request for anything beyond scheduling a service order does have the perseverance to get through, AHS makes it impossible for that customer to obtain resolution on that call. (This is further explained in the next paragraph.) • The AHS employees who answer the phones are well trained, patient, and courteous to a fault. Considering the awkward positions that AHS puts them in day-in-and-day-out, they surely are underpaid.

First, by the time they speak to a customer, the customer is miffed about having been on hold long enough to have listened to all of AHS’ recorded sales pitches two or three times. Secondly, AHS’ procedures put them in the position of telling customers “who else to call” as opposed to empowering them to take any effective action to resolve a problem or complaint. • For customers who have day jobs and other responsibilities, it is difficult to devote a full morning or a full afternoon trying for weeks on end to resolve a problem or complaint with AHS over the phone. Once again, this is all done on purpose.

It is by careful design that AHS frustrates, confuses and discourages its customers from calling. • AHS keeps meticulous records. They do that in part by recording customer phone calls and, of course, by maintaining copies of all written correspondence.

However, since all written correspondence is written exclusively by AHS, it never includes the customer’s complaint or viewpoint. AHS then cherry picks those carefully preserved, one-sided records to convince the Better Business Bureau and others that the customer’s complaint is unfounded.

Original review posted by user Jul 01, 2016

DO BUSINESS WITH AMERICAN HOME SHIELD AT YOUR OWN RISK!

The primary reason so many of their customers (myself included) end up loathing AHS is that the company relies on deceptive marketing practices to sell its services. In many cases, their “partners in deception” are the real estate agents who advise sellers to provide a home warranty and who then tell buyers that the seller’s home warranty has much more value to them than it really does.

By whatever means, AHS’ direct and indirect customers are duped into believing that the AHS warranty pays the full cost of repair or replacement when, in fact, it simply does not. The illusion that “no matter what breaks, all I will have to spend to get it fixed (or replaced!) is $75” is what AHS sells to all of its unsuspecting customers. AHS sells that illusion by deceptive marketing. Listed below are four of the deceptions that seduced me and, I assume, many of you into doing business with AHS. This is what prospective customers will find on the AHS website:

DECEPTION #1: Our home warranty is a contract that covers repair or replacement. As a prospective customer, you want to believe “cover” means AHS will pay whatever it takes to repair or replace any covered item that doesn’t work. As further explained below, that is patently false. However that is exactly what AHS wants you to believe.

DECEPTION #2: You do not pay the replacement cost for covered items. This comes as close as anything I’ve found on the AHS website to being an outright lie. That’s because the contract (which you and I signed…) says “coverage is subject to limitations”. While there are many limitations in the contract, this might be the biggest one: “The customer is responsible for payment of costs in excess of $3,000”. So, under the best of conditions, to replace a $10,000 central A/C unit, AHS pays $3,000 and you pay $7,000. (More than likely, though, AHS will pay nothing to replace your A/C … because they will NEVER decide that it cannot be repaired!)

DECEPTION #3: You do not pay the actual repair cost for covered items. While not nearly as misleading or potentially costly as #2 above, this statement is half true at best. Again, the carefully crafted words are intended to make you believe that AHS pays everything it may take to repair any covered item. But, in reality, they do not. One example is the actual cost of repairing a central air conditioning unit. AHS pays $10/pound for any replacement refrigerant that is required. This leaves you with paying the rest … which amounts to something between $600 and $900.

*DECEPTION #4: AHS has the sole right to determine whether a covered system or appliance will be repaired or replaced. This shows up in the contract, not in the marketing hype. Strictly speaking, therefore, it does not qualify as a deceptive marketing practice. That’s because you and I both had the option of refusing to sign the contract. You and I had the option of walking away instead of forfeiting the right to have any say whatsoever in determining when replacement is necessary. Taking full advantage of volume pricing for repair parts on a nation-wide basis and taking full advantage of its ability to squeeze lower prices out of its local contractors in exchange for bringing them our business, means that AHS is incentivized to repair, not to replace.

ONE PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: WHY AHS WILL NEVER REPLACE MY OLD, CONSTANTLY FALTERING A/C UNIT. (OR YOURS EITHER!)

While I sit here roasting in my house for the second week in a row with no A/C in Florida, in June (but only for the EIGHTH time) -- let’s do the math:

1. Currently I pay AHS $592/year. It goes up each year and, therefore, used to be lower. Still, let’s call it $6,000 for the 10 years.

2. Every time AHS sends a repairman, I pay $75. For the eight trips (to date) to repair my A/C, then, I’ve paid another $600 (8 x $75 = $600). That $75 service fee also goes up each year but I’m rounding off things to make the math easier to follow.

3. Every time an A/C repair entails replacing the refrigerant, I pay between $600 and $900 for the repair. (Remember Deception #3: “You do not pay the actual repair cost…”?!) Presently, there is a leak in the evaporator coil. Instead of spending the $2,500 or so that a new coil would cost, AHS pays its contractor to take it back to his shop, find the leak(s) and patch them up until next time. Since I’ll have to pay to replace the refrigerant again (and AHS just called to tell me I have to pay $975 for the refrigerant this time…), lets call it $1,600 out of my pocket for refrigerant. So, in round numbers, I’ve paid $8,200. So far.

4. Needless to say, AHS has spent considerably less than $8,200 on my repairs. In addition to providing the odd float switches, capacitors etc, they replaced the compressor and the air handler’s fan motor. In the process (counting return trips) they may have paid for 8 or 10 contractor trips to my house. Even when you figure the other trips their contractors may have made to my house and the cost of the hot water heater they replaced a few years ago, AHS is making plenty of money on me.

5. What incentive does AHS have to change their behavior? What incentive does AHS have to EVER exercise their “sole right” to decide to replace instead of repair (over and over, forever) my central A/C? Of course the answer to both questions is “None”.

6. That’s the carefully constructed AHS business model and it’s been working great on me! The AHS lawyers, MBAs and accounts have done their jobs well.

A SECOND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: PRE-PAYING THE $75 SERVICE FEE FOR A SERVICE THAT AHS KNEW OR SHOULD HAVE KNOWN WAS NOT COVERED.

I noticed a pin hole water leak in the water main at the point where it enters my house. I called AHS and clearly explained exactly where the water leak was. I provided complete detail, down to the point of explaining that shutting off the water valve just outside of my house would do no good because the pinhole leak was just to the downstream side of that valve. After AHS asked me if there was any water damage inside of my house, I restated the fact that the leak was OUTSIDE.

When the AHS plumber arrived and looked at the leak, he immediately said “This repair is not covered by AHS because it is outside of the building foundation.” After reading my contract, it was easy to see that he was right. When I asked him whether or not I was obliged to pay his company the $75 service fee, he said “No”. Then, since I had pre-paid that fee directly to AHS at the time I placed the service order, I called AHS to request a refund. As per Reason #4 (below), the AHS person taking my call told me I would have to call someone else. When I ask her instead to relay my reasonable request to her supervisor, she explained that she would have to fill out a form and that AHS would have to listen to the recording of my phone call (to be convinced that I was not lying about all this). Explaining that I did not have the time it would take to wait for another AHS phone call, I asked her to please do that. So far, a week has passed with no sign from AHS that I will ever receive that refund.

THE TOP FOUR REASONS THAT I WILL GET AHS OUT OF MY LIFE. AS SOON AS I CAN. FOREVER. (FOR YOUR OWN WELL BEING, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER DOING THE SAME.)

1. THE BIG LIE. It is comforting to believe that “no matter what breaks, all I will have to spend to get it fixed (or replaced!) is $75”. Utilizing deceptive marketing practices which prey upon the human weakness of “believing what you want to believe”, AHS sells THE BIG LIE to untold thousands of unsuspecting customers nationwide. Once the potential customer has bitten, he/she is reeled in and given a contract that says something quite different. Classic bait-and-switch.

2. The Contractual Handcuffs. Under the terms of my contract with AHS, I voluntarily waived numerous rights and ceded complete control to AHS over the process whereby repairs are made to the covered appliances and systems in my home. That is not a good thing to do for many reasons, including:

• Instead of shopping around for the best price (and prompt installation) on, say, a hot water heater replacement, my family takes cold showers for two weeks while I dicker with AHS and its contractor.

• Instead of calling A/C repair companies until I find one that can provide the service I need “now”, I call AHS and wait for their selected contractor to work me into his schedule. At that point, that contractor has captive business (mine). AHS picked him for my job because he agreed to charge AHS less than other (better? busier?) contractors would have charged them.

• Because I am a “captive”, I cannot take my business elsewhere -- even if I’m treated badly. My only recourse is to complain long enough and loud enough to convince AHS to assign another contractor to my job. That, of course, serves to put me at the end of yet another line.

3. The Opposite of Prompt Service. It is no accident that you and I end up waiting and waiting and waiting, powerless to do anything to minimize or avoid delays. AHS has (of course!) carefully designed their repair process to take whatever time they care to take. Accordingly, they’ve included this disclaimer in your contract and mine: “AHS is not responsible or liable for any … delays”. The AHS repair process does nothing for your convenience or mine. On the contrary, it does everything for the convenience of AHS and everything for minimizing AHS’ costs.

• The first delay is the time it can take (24 business hours = 3 days, not counting weekends) for the contractor to contact you to set up an appointment.

• The news from the AHS contractor (“We-can’t-get-out-there-until-next-Monday”) is but the second of many delays. In many cases, the AHS process requires multiple visits.

• The most common reason for the third delay is that AHS requires their contractors to get specific approval from AHS to proceed with certain repairs. Getting that approval can turn into an additional three-day delay: Day 1, Contractor’s Diagnosis; Day 2, Notify AHS of the diagnosis and request approval to do the repair; Day 3, AHS approval.

• The fourth delay is usually the longest. This delay is imposed on the contractor (and on you, the patsy the “valued customer”) by AHS’ insistence on using repair parts sourced by AHS. Instead of using a part that is available “today” (in stock locally), AHS will take as long as a week to find the part in their system and ship it to their contractor – while you continue roasting or taking cold showers as the case may be.

4. The Communication ***. With apologies to Seinfeld and his “Soup Nazi”, the use of this analogy makes AHS’ dictatorial control over customer communications somewhat easier to comprehend. Simply put, ALL communication between AHS and its customers is done ONLY on AHS’ terms. For example:

• Whenever it suits their purposes, AHS will email its customers. In response, the only thing AHS “allows” its customers to do is call. Normally, calling a large company and talking to an actual human being would be considered a good thing. With AHS, not so; for two reasons: (a) By design(?), customers are ALWAYS required to wait on hold for a minimum of 20 minutes, thereby holding down the number of customers who call. (b) Whenever a customer with a complaint or a request for anything beyond scheduling a service order does have the perseverance to get through, AHS makes it impossible for that customer to obtain resolution on that call. (This is further explained in the next paragraph.)

• The AHS employees who answer the phones are well trained, patient, and courteous to a fault. Considering the awkward positions that AHS puts them in day-in-and-day-out, they surely are underpaid. First, by the time they speak to a customer, the customer is miffed about having been on hold long enough to have listened to all of AHS’ recorded sales pitches two or three times. Secondly, AHS’ procedures put them in the position of telling customers “who else to call” as opposed to empowering them to take any effective action to resolve a problem or complaint.

• For customers who have day jobs and other responsibilities, it is difficult to devote a full morning or a full afternoon trying for weeks on end to resolve a problem or complaint with AHS over the phone. Once again, this is all done on purpose. It is by careful design that AHS frustrates, confuses and discourages its customers from calling.

• AHS keeps meticulous records. They do that in part by recording customer phone calls and, of course, by maintaining copies of all written correspondence. However, since all written correspondence is written exclusively by AHS, it never includes the customer’s complaint or viewpoint. AHS then cherry picks those carefully preserved, one-sided records to convince the Better Business Bureau and others that the customer’s complaint is unfounded.

Product or Service Mentioned: American Home Shield Air Conditioner Warranty.

Reason of review: Bad quality.

Monetary Loss: $3000.

Preferred solution: ASH owes me $3,000 for replacement of my central A/C unit..

American Home Shield Pros: Idea.

American Home Shield Cons: Deceptive marketing practices.

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